Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:45
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:45
Description:
Bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am and returns at 8:45 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Shacharit
At Moreshet Yisrael
7:30
8:45
9:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Description:
5 Levels of Hebrew Ulpan - Aleph, Aleph+, Bet, Bet+, Gimmel-Dalet, & Heh-Vav
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Keilim - Beginner Talmud
Tabick
9:00
12:15
Keilim - Intermediate Talmud
Silverstein
9:00
12:15
Description:
We will focus on issues such as when and how it is performed, the rabbinic idea of its origins, the nature of its obligation and its structure. In addition, we will focus on the acquisition of Talmud study skills, how a Talmudic argument is shaped and how the Talmud acts as a means for the interpretation of rabbinic Judaism’s earlier traditions.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Description:
5 Levels of Hebrew Ulpan - Aleph, Aleph+, Bet, Bet+, Gimmel-Dalet, & Heh-Vav
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Keilim - Beginner Talmud
Levy
9:00
12:15
Keilim - Intermediate Talmud
Cohen
9:00
12:15
Description:
Is prayer an ecstatic outpouring of emotion or a steady daily conversation? Does daily prayer mean we give up on passion? Our Talmud class, geared towards intermediate to advanced students, will explore the notions of prayer that are in tension in the fourth chapter of Tractate Brachot, with careful attention to the ebb and flow of the Talmudic sugia. As we see the creation of a fixed liturgy unfold, we will see how the Rabbis attempt to harmonize spontaneity and sustainability, keva and kavana.Did the rabbis see themselves as activists? Were they ‘the establishment’ or radical change agents? How does divine justice relate to human justice?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Description:
5 Levels of Hebrew Ulpan - Aleph, Aleph+, Bet, Bet+, Gimmel-Dalet, & Heh-Vav
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Keilim - Beginner Talmud
Tabick
9:00
12:15
Keilim - Intermediate Talmud
Silverstein
9:00
12:15
Description:
We will focus on issues such as when and how it is performed, the rabbinic idea of its origins, the nature of its obligation and its structure. In addition, we will focus on the acquisition of Talmud study skills, how a Talmudic argument is shaped and how the Talmud acts as a means for the interpretation of rabbinic Judaism’s earlier traditions.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Description:
5 Levels of Hebrew Ulpan - Aleph, Aleph+, Bet, Bet+, Gimmel-Dalet, & Heh-Vav
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Keilim - Beginner Talmud
Levy
9:00
12:15
Keilim - Intermediate Talmud
Cohen
9:00
12:15
Description:
Is prayer an ecstatic outpouring of emotion or a steady daily conversation? Does daily prayer mean we give up on passion? Our Talmud class, geared towards intermediate to advanced students, will explore the notions of prayer that are in tension in the fourth chapter of Tractate Brachot, with careful attention to the ebb and flow of the Talmudic sugia. As we see the creation of a fixed liturgy unfold, we will see how the Rabbis attempt to harmonize spontaneity and sustainability, keva and kavana.Did the rabbis see themselves as activists? Were they ‘the establishment’ or radical change agents? How does divine justice relate to human justice?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Description:
5 Levels of Hebrew Ulpan - Aleph, Aleph+, Bet, Bet+, Gimmel-Dalet, & Heh-Vav
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Keilim - Beginner Talmud
Tabick
9:00
12:15
Keilim - Intermediate Talmud
Silverstein
9:00
12:15
Description:
We will focus on issues such as when and how it is performed, the rabbinic idea of its origins, the nature of its obligation and its structure. In addition, we will focus on the acquisition of Talmud study skills, how a Talmudic argument is shaped and how the Talmud acts as a means for the interpretation of rabbinic Judaism’s earlier traditions.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
12:00
Lunch Break
12:15
13:15
Lunch Break
12:15
13:15
Lunch Break
12:15
13:15
Lunch Break
12:15
13:15
Lunch & Learn - The Zohar
Rothberg
12:15
13:15
13:00
Mishnah & Midrash (beginner)
Silverstein
13:15
15:45
Description:
In this course we will examine the basic building blocks of the Torah She’baal Peh – the Oral Torah – the Mishnah, Tosefta and midrash - the interpretive tradition which links the law to its sources in the Torah. We will pay special attention to the skills which will give students the ability to continue their studies of the Oral tradition.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud (int/adv)
Cohen
13:15
15:45
Description:
This course is an in depth study of parts of the 2nd chapter of Sanhedrin, "kohen gadol." We will carefully trace the structure and development of the Talmudic sugiot. This chapter deals with fundamental questions in the area of leadership and its limitations. By exploring the characters of high priest and king the rabbis establish a notion of leadership that is at once distant and involved, all powerful and severely limited. The chapter raises important questions on the expectations and limitation of government that are particularly relevant for today. The course requires an ability to read some Talmud with Rashi. The course will emphasize the development of the conceptions internal to any given sugya. Attention will be paid to the breadth of material in the Tannaitic literature and to parallels in the Yerushalmi with an eye towards the values and worldview underlying the sugiot.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Way of Faith in the Zohar
Rothberg
13:15
15:45
Description:
A life of Torah and Mitsvot has a certain rhythm: The sounds of holy words at morning and evening; the structuring of time into Shabbat and the days of the week; the taste of matsa in the spring - not tasting anything for one day in the summer - the fragrance of etrog in the Fall; all of these impact on the way of life or life-rhythm of those who live them. For the Zohar, this Torah life-rhythm is meant to wake us up to the presence of God. Jewish prayer and ritual involve cultivating particular states of consciousness through which we connect to divine energies. In this course, we will explore some of the spiritual rhythm of Jewish life through the prism of the Zohar. Our methods will be text-study, meditation, visualization and chanting.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Sugiyot in Social Justice
Cohen
13:15
15:45
Description:
Sugiyot in Social Justice, A Methodology of Reading for Change" is a three-part series that will present a range of ways of confronting particularly difficult texts in our tradition. In the first session will examine Biblical texts that deal with xenophobia and misogyny and to ask what, if anything they have to tell us about ourselves or our world. In the second we will see one of the rare incidences of rape in the Bible and its Rabbinic retelling, through this reading we will ask questions about the nature of consent and coercion. In the third, we look at two texts of protest, Abraham at Sodom and Hannah in her plea for a child. We will examine how these characters challenge God and how they may serve as models for a contemporary demand for justice and equality.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Torah of Human Rights
Rothberg
13:15
15:45
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Mishnah & Midrash (beginner)
Silverstein
13:15
15:45
Description:
In this course we will examine the basic building blocks of the Torah She’baal Peh – the Oral Torah – the Mishnah, Tosefta and midrash - the interpretive tradition which links the law to its sources in the Torah. We will pay special attention to the skills which will give students the ability to continue their studies of the Oral tradition.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud (int/adv)
Cohen
13:15
15:45
Description:
This course is an in depth study of parts of the 2nd chapter of Sanhedrin, "kohen gadol." We will carefully trace the structure and development of the Talmudic sugiot. This chapter deals with fundamental questions in the area of leadership and its limitations. By exploring the characters of high priest and king the rabbis establish a notion of leadership that is at once distant and involved, all powerful and severely limited. The chapter raises important questions on the expectations and limitation of government that are particularly relevant for today. The course requires an ability to read some Talmud with Rashi. The course will emphasize the development of the conceptions internal to any given sugya. Attention will be paid to the breadth of material in the Tannaitic literature and to parallels in the Yerushalmi with an eye towards the values and worldview underlying the sugiot.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Way of Faith in the Zohar
Rothberg
13:15
15:45
Description:
A life of Torah and Mitsvot has a certain rhythm: The sounds of holy words at morning and evening; the structuring of time into Shabbat and the days of the week; the taste of matsa in the spring - not tasting anything for one day in the summer - the fragrance of etrog in the Fall; all of these impact on the way of life or life-rhythm of those who live them. For the Zohar, this Torah life-rhythm is meant to wake us up to the presence of God. Jewish prayer and ritual involve cultivating particular states of consciousness through which we connect to divine energies. In this course, we will explore some of the spiritual rhythm of Jewish life through the prism of the Zohar. Our methods will be text-study, meditation, visualization and chanting.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Crossroads - Walking Encounter
including Mincha
13:45
18:00
Description:
The issues facing Israeli society today are as complex and multi-faceted as the long history of this ancient land. During Crossroads, we will tackle issues of politics, religion, and social justice through a combination of text study, walking tours, and interfacing with key change-makers in Israel today. Come with a curious mind and, when needed, good walking shoes.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty:
Mishnah & Midrash (beginner)
Silverstein
13:15
15:45
Description:
In this course we will examine the basic building blocks of the Torah She’baal Peh – the Oral Torah – the Mishnah, Tosefta and midrash - the interpretive tradition which links the law to its sources in the Torah. We will pay special attention to the skills which will give students the ability to continue their studies of the Oral tradition.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud (int/adv)
Cohen
13:15
15:45
Description:
This course is an in depth study of parts of the 2nd chapter of Sanhedrin, "kohen gadol." We will carefully trace the structure and development of the Talmudic sugiot. This chapter deals with fundamental questions in the area of leadership and its limitations. By exploring the characters of high priest and king the rabbis establish a notion of leadership that is at once distant and involved, all powerful and severely limited. The chapter raises important questions on the expectations and limitation of government that are particularly relevant for today. The course requires an ability to read some Talmud with Rashi. The course will emphasize the development of the conceptions internal to any given sugya. Attention will be paid to the breadth of material in the Tannaitic literature and to parallels in the Yerushalmi with an eye towards the values and worldview underlying the sugiot.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Way of Faith in the Zohar
Rothberg
13:15
15:45
Description:
A life of Torah and Mitsvot has a certain rhythm: The sounds of holy words at morning and evening; the structuring of time into Shabbat and the days of the week; the taste of matsa in the spring - not tasting anything for one day in the summer - the fragrance of etrog in the Fall; all of these impact on the way of life or life-rhythm of those who live them. For the Zohar, this Torah life-rhythm is meant to wake us up to the presence of God. Jewish prayer and ritual involve cultivating particular states of consciousness through which we connect to divine energies. In this course, we will explore some of the spiritual rhythm of Jewish life through the prism of the Zohar. Our methods will be text-study, meditation, visualization and chanting.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
15:00
Mincha & Announcements
15:45
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
15:45
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
15:45
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
15:45
16:00
16:00
Conservative Responsa
Roth
16:00
18:00
Description:
This course will offer a critical and analytical look at more well-known and not so well-known responsa of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards (Law Committee) of the Conservative Movement. We will read each responsum (in English), check some of its sources and examine the halachic process followed.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Dr. Joel Roth
It's Good to be the King - Kingship in the Tanakh
Stern Rosenblatt
16:00
18:00
Description:
Who should rule and how can they be just? What role should God play in the relationship between ruler and people? Is good rule even possible? While tracing the development of the institution of kings, we will also pay close attention to the literary and theological concerns that arise from the texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt
Rav Kook: Theology, Prayer & Politics
Rothberg
16:00
18:00
Description:
Rabbi Avraham Yitschak Hakohen Kook was a pioneer, both of settling Eretz Yisrael and of Jewish thought. He combined Jewish mysticism with contemporary philosophy; traditional piety with Zionist activism. Rav Kook's sometimes radical theology has electrified generations of Israeli religious Jews and substantially impacted upon Israeli society. His literary legacy is a well-spring through which we can deepen our own religious lives. But also highlights some real dangers of religion. In this course, we will explore Rav Kook's thinking on a range of topics such as evolution, the nature of God, the logic of Jewish spiritual practice and the significance of Eretz Yisrael.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Tefilah Workshop
Shrell-Fox
16:00
18:00
Conservative Responsa
Roth
16:00
18:00
Description:
This course will offer a critical and analytical look at more well-known and not so well-known responsa of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards (Law Committee) of the Conservative Movement. We will read each responsum (in English), check some of its sources and examine the halachic process followed.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Dr. Joel Roth
It's Good to be the King - Kingship in the Tanakh
Stern Rosenblatt
16:00
18:00
Description:
Who should rule and how can they be just? What role should God play in the relationship between ruler and people? Is good rule even possible? While tracing the development of the institution of kings, we will also pay close attention to the literary and theological concerns that arise from the texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt
Conservative Responsa
Roth
16:00
18:00
Description:
This course will offer a critical and analytical look at more well-known and not so well-known responsa of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards (Law Committee) of the Conservative Movement. We will read each responsum (in English), check some of its sources and examine the halachic process followed.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Dr. Joel Roth
It's Good to be the King - Kingship in the Tanakh
Stern Rosenblatt
16:00
18:00
Description:
Who should rule and how can they be just? What role should God play in the relationship between ruler and people? Is good rule even possible? While tracing the development of the institution of kings, we will also pay close attention to the literary and theological concerns that arise from the texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt