Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:30
Description:
The bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
8:00
Breakfast
8:30
8:45
Breakfast
8:45
9:00
Breakfast
8:30
8:45
Breakfast
8:45
9:00
Breakfast
8:45
9:00
9:00
Talmud 1
M. Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud 2
Kurshan
9:00
12:00
Description:

Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Ilana Kurshan
Talmud 3
Cohen
9:00
12:00
Talmud 4
Kulp
9:00
12:00
Talmud - Geiger
Salzberg
9:00
12:00
Talmud 1
M. Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud 2
Brody
9:00
12:00
Talmud 3
Cohen
9:00
12:00
Talmud 4
Kulp
9:00
12:00
Talmud 1
M. Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud 2
Brody
9:00
12:00
Talmud 3
Cohen
9:00
12:00
Talmud 4
Kulp
9:00
12:00
Talmud - Geiger
Salzberg
9:00
12:00
Talmud 1
Kurshan
9:00
12:00
Description:

Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Ilana Kurshan
Talmud 2
Brody
9:00
12:00
Talmud 3
Cohen
9:00
12:00
Talmud 4
Kulp
9:00
12:00
Talmud - Geiger
Aviezer
9:00
12:00
The Torah of Human Rights - Achvat Amim
Rothberg
9:00
12:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Israel Education
9:00
12:00
12:00
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Community Lunch
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
13:00
Haggadah: From History to Halakhah
Kulp
13:15
16:15
Description:
The Haggadah and Seder developed in the wake of the Destruction of the Second Temple and to this day remain the richest and most observed Jewish ritual. In this class we will trace the development of the Seder and Haggadah from their origins in the tannaitic period through their manifestations in practical halakhah. Topics we will focus on include the dipping and appetizer before the meal, blessing over handwashing, and the afikoman.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Dr. Joshua Kulp
Talmudic Aggadah
Kurshan
13:15
16:15
The Five Megillot
Hollander-Goldfarb
13:15
16:15
Description:
Shir Hashirim is the picture of young Shlomo Hamelekh, while Kohelet was written in the end of his life, so claims the Midrash. Where do the poems, the thoughts, and the stories of the Five Megillot take us? From the fields of Beit Lehem to the palaces of Persia, from the glory and angst of love to the futility of old age, from communal tragedy to personal retrospect. Where are you in the Megillot? Let’s explore together.We will study the stories in the center of the book of Kings, sharpening biblical story and Parshanut skills, and raising some disturbing questions. We will discover new angles to stories and characters we might have thought we knew, and become familiar with some stories that are rarely studied, but should be. The texts will be in Hebrew. The Hevruta sheets (guiding questions) will be in English. Recommended text: Tanakh Melachim Mikraot Geldolot or any Mefarshim they want. Not necessary on day 1.
Required Texts: Tanakh (must include Hebrew)
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
Advanced Midrash
Cohen
13:15
16:15
Description:
Sifrei Devarim, the Tannatic Midrash on the book of Deuteronomy contains some of the most beautiful meditations on the God, Torah and Israel found in Rabbinic literature. This course will be an in-depth study of Sifrei Ha’azinu. We will develop interpretative sensitivity through a close reading of the Biblcal text and the ways in which the Rabbis read and interpret. The class, while building skills and providing tools to analyse Midrashic literature as a method of adapting and making the Bible eternally relevant, will also explore Rabbinic theology and philosophy on concepts such as reward and punishment, Divine Justice, Torah study and more. This course also aims to give the student the tools to evaluate critical textual problems in midrashic texts, to trace the evolution of the use of midrashic texts through their historical evolution, how to evaluate variant textual traditions, and how to use classical and modern commentaries in interpreting midrashim.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
Exploring the Zohar – Book of Radiance
Rothberg
13:15
16:15
Description:
Since its mysterious appearance some seven hundred years ago, the Zohar has emerged as one of the most powerful forces in the history of Jewish tradition. The Zohar’s radical hermeneutics, its passionate and often erotic religious intensity, and its mystical formulation of Judaism’s fundamental ideas, have riveted many of Israel’s greatest sages while appalling others. This class is an introduction to the Zohar through a close reading of selected texts. We will approach the text in its original Aramaic alongside Hebrew and English translations. We’ll also explore how practices like guided imagination and chanting can help evoke the power of the text.
Required Texts: Photocopies of material will be distributed.
Schedule: Meets once per week
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Mysticism for Real Life
D. Silverstein
13:15
16:15
Description:
In this course we'll study key kabbalistic concepts such as the Sefirot of the Tree of Life, and learn about their development through the centuries of Jewish texts. Our focus will be on how the concepts we learn relate to our lived experiences, our day-to-day dilemmas, and our regular practices, such as Tefilah, Tzedakah, relationships, studying and so on
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Daniel Raphael Silverstein
Class for Geiger
Aviezer
13:15
16:15
Language Skills for Text Learning
Zacharow
13:15
15:15
Description:
Students of Tanakh and those who have occasion to read or chant biblical or rabbinical texts often want to learn how to bring each word and verse into sharper focus, to be able to understand them and pronounce them with greater precision. This introduction to the sounds, word structures, and sentence structures that characterize Biblical Hebrew and Rabbinical Hebrew— distinct dialects from modern Hebrew—can help make that happen. Text (copies in Bet Midrash): Biblical Hebrew for Students of Modern Israeli Hebrew by Marc Brettler.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Shlomo Zacharow
Sugiyot of Social Justice
Cohen
13:15
15:15
Golden Calf & Anger of God
Rothberg
13:15
16:15
Tanakh
Hollander-Goldfarb
13:15
16:15
Midrash & Parshanut
M. Silverstein
13:15
16:15
Hasidut
D. Silverstein
13:15
16:15
Judaism, Human Rights and the Status of the "Non-Jew" in Israel
Rothberg
13:15
16:15
Description:
In this course, we’ll explore the relationship between Judaism and human rights through the prism of the status of "non-Jews" in Israel (both in the sense of the Land of Israel and the State of Israel). We will employ a multi-disciplinary approach, exploring perspectives provided by Halacha, Jewish thought, modern Israeli law and international human rights law. We will also address aspects of modern Israel's history and politics. We will consider the issues from a critical academic perspective but also in light of their implications for our own Jewish identities.
Required Texts: Photocopies of material will be distributed.
Schedule: Meets once per week (Thursday mornings)
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
15:00
Minchah & Announcements
15:15
15:30
Practical Halakha - Beginner
M. Silverstein
15:30
18:30
Practical Halakha - Kashrut Level 1
Zacharow
15:30
18:30
Practical Halakha - Kashrut Level 2
Roth
15:30
18:30
16:00
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Jewish Meditation & Theology Workshop
Rothberg
16:30
18:15
Upper Level Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
16:30
18:15
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Modern Jewish Thought
Rothberg
16:30
18:15
Tefillah Skills Workshop
Shrell-Fox
16:30
18:15
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Contemporary Teshuvot
M. Silverstein
16:30
18:15
Upper Level Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
16:30
18:15
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Shechitah Program
Zacharow
16:30
18:00
18:00
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Maariv
18:30
18:45