Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:30
Description:
The bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
8:00
Breakfast
Dvar Yomi at 8:55
8:30
9:00
Breakfast
Dvar Yomi at 8:55
8:30
9:00
Breakfast
Dvar Yomi at 8:55
8:30
9:00
Breakfast
Dvar Yomi at 8:55
8:30
9:00
Breakfast
8:45
9:00
9:00
Talmud I
Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary. This year we will be learning passages from Tractate Shabbat. We will examine the concept of “melacha” – forbidden work, and how the rabbinic interpretation of this term came to define the meaning of Shabbat and how we observe it.
Required Texts: Mishna Shabbat, Talmud Shabbat, appropriate dictionaries
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud II & III - Greatest Hits of the Bavli
Kurshan
9:00
12:00
Description:
Greatest Hits of the Bavli: A Guided Tour of the Talmud’s Tractates In this class we will look at various sugyot (Talmudic passages) from throughout the Babylonian Talmud, beginning with Tractate Berakhot and moving on to Seder Moed then Seder Nashim, and finally Seder Nezikin. In each class we will examine a different sugya, beginning with the Mishnah and moving in to the Talmudic discussion of that Mishnah. The goal of this class is to give students a sense of the range of issues covered in the Talmud, the questions that animate the rabbis, and the way they go about seeking answers and making meaning.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Ilana Kurshan
Talmud I
Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary. This year we will be learning passages from Tractate Shabbat. We will examine the concept of “melacha” – forbidden work, and how the rabbinic interpretation of this term came to define the meaning of Shabbat and how we observe it.
Required Texts: Mishna Shabbat, Talmud Shabbat, appropriate dictionaries
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud II
Levy
9:00
12:00
Description:
Jewish life through millennia of diaspora could not be maintained by an infinitely deferred promise of future rewards in exchange for current suffering. It required Jews to taste for themselves the immediate benefits of a life of spiritual practice. Shabbat has played a major role in allowing regular Jews to touch redemption in daily life. We will see how the detailed, disciplined practices of Shabbat were shaped by the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud to that end. This course is for students with a limited background in rabbinics to learn to unpack the highly compressed literary and legal texts of the tannaitic period and to see how they evolved when they were interpreted in light of the different concerns, genres and approaches of the Amora'im. We will aim to furnish students with the skills both to become independent readers of the Mishnah and Talmud and to see the philosophical and religious issues at play behind the highly technical language of these texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Joel Levy
Talmud III
S. Cohen
9:00
12:00
Description:
While Shabbat has remained central to Jewish identity and practice since the Bible, the notions of Shabbat and its observance have hardly remained static. Instead over the course of several generations the Jews imagined and re-imagined what a palace in time and space would look like in their study and innovations around the concept of Shabbat. A close look at at Masechet Shabbat is at once a study of the Rabbi’s attempts at bridging the gap between tradition and innovation and an opportunity to explore the ways in which we continue to create sacred space and time today, divide between holy and profane and create community. This level course is for students who have already acquired a certain familiarity with the study of Mishnah and Talmud. We will begin by reading chapters of Mishnah Shabbat together with parallel sections from the Tosefta. We will go on to study chapters from Bavli Shabbat with Rashi’s commentary – with special attention being paid to the tannaitic background of the Talmudic discussions, the literary structure of those discussions and their social, moral, and philosophical underpinnings. Students will leave the class with the ability to independently study a Talmudic sugia with tools available in the Beit Midrash.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud I
Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary. This year we will be learning passages from Tractate Shabbat. We will examine the concept of “melacha” – forbidden work, and how the rabbinic interpretation of this term came to define the meaning of Shabbat and how we observe it.
Required Texts: Mishna Shabbat, Talmud Shabbat, appropriate dictionaries
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud II
Levy
9:00
12:00
Description:
Jewish life through millennia of diaspora could not be maintained by an infinitely deferred promise of future rewards in exchange for current suffering. It required Jews to taste for themselves the immediate benefits of a life of spiritual practice. Shabbat has played a major role in allowing regular Jews to touch redemption in daily life. We will see how the detailed, disciplined practices of Shabbat were shaped by the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud to that end. This course is for students with a limited background in rabbinics to learn to unpack the highly compressed literary and legal texts of the tannaitic period and to see how they evolved when they were interpreted in light of the different concerns, genres and approaches of the Amora'im. We will aim to furnish students with the skills both to become independent readers of the Mishnah and Talmud and to see the philosophical and religious issues at play behind the highly technical language of these texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Joel Levy
Talmud III
S. Cohen
9:00
12:00
Description:
While Shabbat has remained central to Jewish identity and practice since the Bible, the notions of Shabbat and its observance have hardly remained static. Instead over the course of several generations the Jews imagined and re-imagined what a palace in time and space would look like in their study and innovations around the concept of Shabbat. A close look at at Masechet Shabbat is at once a study of the Rabbi’s attempts at bridging the gap between tradition and innovation and an opportunity to explore the ways in which we continue to create sacred space and time today, divide between holy and profane and create community. This level course is for students who have already acquired a certain familiarity with the study of Mishnah and Talmud. We will begin by reading chapters of Mishnah Shabbat together with parallel sections from the Tosefta. We will go on to study chapters from Bavli Shabbat with Rashi’s commentary – with special attention being paid to the tannaitic background of the Talmudic discussions, the literary structure of those discussions and their social, moral, and philosophical underpinnings. Students will leave the class with the ability to independently study a Talmudic sugia with tools available in the Beit Midrash.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud I
Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
The rabbinic tradition represented a transformation in the Jewish tradition. It introduced the idea that universal study could be a means for both transcendence and the search for truth. The Babylonian Talmud may be its crown achievement. Shaped between the first through sixth century, it contains a panoply of the elements that make up Jewish life and religion. Throughout the ages, its unique way of argumentation has provided its charm and its challenge. The ability to fathom its depths has been a lynchpin in shaping Jewish identity. In Introductory Talmud, we first focus on the earliest works of the rabbinic tradition: Mishnah, Midrash Halakha and Tosefta as independent texts before moving on to see how the Talmud uses them and other materials to build the basic units of Talmudic discussion know as a sugya or argument. Emphasis will be placed on learning Talmudic terminology, the structure of the Talmudic sugya, and on the Talmud’s manner of interpreting earlier sources. This class aims at fostering independent learning skills including the use of Rashi’s commentary. This year we will be learning passages from Tractate Shabbat. We will examine the concept of “melacha” – forbidden work, and how the rabbinic interpretation of this term came to define the meaning of Shabbat and how we observe it.
Required Texts: Mishna Shabbat, Talmud Shabbat, appropriate dictionaries
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language: English/עברית
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Talmud II
Levy
9:00
12:00
Description:
Jewish life through millennia of diaspora could not be maintained by an infinitely deferred promise of future rewards in exchange for current suffering. It required Jews to taste for themselves the immediate benefits of a life of spiritual practice. Shabbat has played a major role in allowing regular Jews to touch redemption in daily life. We will see how the detailed, disciplined practices of Shabbat were shaped by the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud to that end. This course is for students with a limited background in rabbinics to learn to unpack the highly compressed literary and legal texts of the tannaitic period and to see how they evolved when they were interpreted in light of the different concerns, genres and approaches of the Amora'im. We will aim to furnish students with the skills both to become independent readers of the Mishnah and Talmud and to see the philosophical and religious issues at play behind the highly technical language of these texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule: Meets 4 mornings per week. The time is divided between chevruta and shiur.
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Joel Levy
Talmud III
S. Cohen
9:00
12:00
Description:
While Shabbat has remained central to Jewish identity and practice since the Bible, the notions of Shabbat and its observance have hardly remained static. Instead over the course of several generations the Jews imagined and re-imagined what a palace in time and space would look like in their study and innovations around the concept of Shabbat. A close look at at Masechet Shabbat is at once a study of the Rabbi’s attempts at bridging the gap between tradition and innovation and an opportunity to explore the ways in which we continue to create sacred space and time today, divide between holy and profane and create community. This level course is for students who have already acquired a certain familiarity with the study of Mishnah and Talmud. We will begin by reading chapters of Mishnah Shabbat together with parallel sections from the Tosefta. We will go on to study chapters from Bavli Shabbat with Rashi’s commentary – with special attention being paid to the tannaitic background of the Talmudic discussions, the literary structure of those discussions and their social, moral, and philosophical underpinnings. Students will leave the class with the ability to independently study a Talmudic sugia with tools available in the Beit Midrash.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
The Torah of Human Rights - Achvat Amim
Rothberg
9:00
12:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Judaism, Human Rights & the Status of Non-Jews in Israel
Rothberg
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course, we’ll explore the relationship between Judaism and human rights through the prism of the status of non-Jews in Israel (both in the sense of the Land of Israel and the State of Israel). This issue requires a multi-disciplinary approach, exploring perspectives provided by Halacha, Jewish thought, modern Israeli law and international human rights law. Critical aspects of the issue also involve modern Israel's history and politics. To get at the fundamental issues at stake, we will touch on all these aspects through text study and meetings with activists and ideologues. We will also consider possible implications for our own Jewish identities.
Required Texts: Photocopies of material will be distributed.
Schedule: Meets once per week (Thursday mornings)
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Social Justice in Israeli Society - Power, Money & Social Change
Cohen
9:00
12:00
Description:
Jewish social justice discourse often revolves primarily around the axis of tselem elohim - being made in the image of God and tikkun olam, the imperative to repair a broken world. While these concepts are important and do provide a basis for equality and social change they alone do not account for the complexity of the issues that we face in striving for a just society. This course will get at why it is so difficult to achieve justice and equality. We will examine competing values and priorities that are at stake when we strive for justice, be it economic, gender based or ethnic. This course is an in depth look at some of the most pressing social justice issues facing Israel today. We will examine these issues through the lense of Biblical and Rabbinic texts alongside contemporary social, economic and feminist theory. We will get to know the issues as they played over the course of history and apply them to the reality today. Specifically we will address resource allocation and economic justice; gender issues; immigration and ethnic diversity.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
12:00
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
Communal Lunch
With Sicha
12:00
13:15
Lunch
12:00
13:15
13:00
Gan Eden & the Human Condition
Rothberg
13:15
16:15
Description:
Gan Eden and the Human Condition: A Journey through Bible, Midrash, Kabbalah and Philosophy
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Romantic Rabbis
Kurshan
13:15
16:15
Description:
This class will consider several Talmudic stories about romantic relationships in the biblical and rabbinic worlds. We will study such figures as Joseph who avoided the temptation of Potiphar’s wife, the Israelite women in Egypt who seduced their husbands, the rabbi who mistook his wife for a prostitute, and the rabbi who kept a woman at every port. In addition to analyzing each story as a self-contained literary unit, we will also consider why the rabbis chose to tell such stories about themselves and their biblical heroes, and what these stories reveal about their worldview. We will then move on to other romantic relationships in the Talmud – not those between rabbis and women, but between rabbis and Torah and the rabbis and the Temple. We will explore how Torah and the Temple became sites of yearning and passion, rendering the Talmud a surprisingly variegated romantic corpus.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Ilana Kurshan
Chumash
Stern Rosenblatt
13:15
16:15
Description:
Following the foundational stories of the universe, humanity and the nation of Israel, we will practice performing readings of Genesis from a range of different perspectives. The stories you think you know will take on multiple new meanings through a deep exploration of the text. Underlying every reading is our attempt to make sense of Bereshit as a whole and its connection to the rest of the Chumash. We will develop our Biblical Hebrew reading skills and begin to work with mefarshim (commentators), particularly Rashi.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt
The Five Megillot
Hollander-Goldfarb
13:15
16:15
Description:
Shir Hashirim is the picture of young Shlomo Hamelekh, while Kohelet was written in the end of his life, so claims the Midrash. Where do the poems, the thoughts, and the stories of the Five Megillot take us? From the fields of Beit Lehem to the palaces of Persia, from the glory and angst of love to the futility of old age, from communal tragedy to personal retrospect. Where are you in the Megillot? Let’s explore together.We will study the stories in the center of the book of Kings, sharpening biblical story and Parshanut skills, and raising some disturbing questions. We will discover new angles to stories and characters we might have thought we knew, and become familiar with some stories that are rarely studied, but should be. The texts will be in Hebrew. The Hevruta sheets (guiding questions) will be in English. Recommended text: Tanakh Melachim Mikraot Geldolot or any Mefarshim they want. Not necessary on day 1.
Required Texts: Tanakh (must include Hebrew)
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
Practical Halakha - Beginner
Levy
13:15
16:15
Practical Halakha - Advanced - P'ru U'rvu
Zacharow
13:15
16:15
Description:
As a complement to the fall course where we studied death and mourning in halakha, in this component we will learn about the celebration of life. We will begin by examining intimacy between a couple including pre-marital or non-marital relations in the prism of the Jewish tradition. Afterwards, we will examine the mitzvah to produce offspring and then beginning of life issues and milestones: blessings upon birth, choosing a name, circumcision, welcoming a daughter into the covenant and pidyon ha-ben (redemption of the first born). Our guides will be the famous Shulhan Arukh as well as the Arukh Ha-shulhan. There will be additional source sheets outlining the process of halakhic development grounded in the Talmud through the commentaries of the medieval period and the best-known codes of Jewish law and responsa literature. While studying the traditional texts, we will constantly be widening our halakhic perspective and discussing the relevance to our personal and communal lives as Jews in the 21st century.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Shlomo Zacharow
Advanced Midrash
S. Cohen
13:15
16:15
Description:
Sifrei Devarim, the Tannatic Midrash on the book of Deuteronomy contains some of the most beautiful meditations on the God, Torah and Israel found in Rabbinic literature. This course will be an in-depth study of Sifrei Ha’azinu. We will develop interpretative sensitivity through a close reading of the Biblcal text and the ways in which the Rabbis read and interpret. The class, while building skills and providing tools to analyse Midrashic literature as a method of adapting and making the Bible eternally relevant, will also explore Rabbinic theology and philosophy on concepts such as reward and punishment, Divine Justice, Torah study and more. This course also aims to give the student the tools to evaluate critical textual problems in midrashic texts, to trace the evolution of the use of midrashic texts through their historical evolution, how to evaluate variant textual traditions, and how to use classical and modern commentaries in interpreting midrashim.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Exploring the Zohar – Book of Radiance
Rothberg
13:15
16:15
Description:
Since its mysterious appearance some seven hundred years ago, the Zohar has emerged as one of the most powerful forces in the history of Jewish tradition. The Zohar’s radical hermeneutics, its passionate and often erotic religious intensity, and its mystical formulation of Judaism’s fundamental ideas, have riveted many of Israel’s greatest sages while appalling others. This class is an introduction to the Zohar through a close reading of selected texts. We will approach the text in its original Aramaic alongside Hebrew and English translations. We’ll also explore how practices like guided imagination and chanting can help evoke the power of the text.
Required Texts: Photocopies of material will be distributed.
Schedule: Meets once per week
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Israel Education
13:15
16:15
16:00
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
The Teachings and Stories of Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav
Silverstein
16:30
18:30
Description:
Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav was the grandson of the Baal Shem Tov. He is especially well-known for his unique theological and psychological take on religious reality best expressed in his drashot and his folkish stories. In tis course we will explore both.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
The Hebrew Goddess in the Zohar
Rothberg
16:30
18:30
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Rav Kook: Theology, Prayer & Politics
Rothberg
16:30
18:30
What Exactly is Torah? The Concept of Torah in Rabbinic Thought
Silverstein
16:30
18:30
Description:
We have been led to believe that Judaism has a singular monolithic view of the nature of the Torah tradition. This course will explore the variegated and often conflicting ideas and definitions of what Torah and revelation are all about. Some of the questions we will explore are: Did the Torah always exist or was it something revealed at a discreet point in history? What is the human role in the revelation of the Torah? Was the Torah meant for all people or just the Jews? Did the non-Jewish world have prophets who were the equal of Moses? Was the Torah intended just for humans or for angels as well? What exactly was revealed at Sinai?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Jewish Spirituality
Smith
16:30
18:30
Description:
This class will explore Rabbi Kalonymus Kalman Shapira’s, the Piaseczna Rebbe’s, Conscious Community: A Guide to Inner Work, translated by Andrea Cohen-Kiener from the original Hebrew, Bnei Machshava Tova. In her words "Within this volume, Reb Kalonymus teaches the art of self-observation. The reader is exhorted to be mindful of God at all times, with specific advice given for enhancing the experience of prayer. By addressing adults who are not withdrawn from worldly pursuits, Reb Kalonymus has provided a timeless guide to Jewish spirituality that will be an invaluable resource for today's seekers." The class is designed to provide the necessary tools enabling the student to encounter the Divine Presence within and to hear the soul's unique "still small voice." The goal is to develop an expanded Godly consciousness, sensing the Divine in an immanent, visceral and authentic way.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty:
Great Jewish Books that Jews Never Read
Kulp
16:30
18:30
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Tefilah
Levy
16:30
18:30
Description:
For a large proportion of Jews in the diaspora public Tefilah/prayer is a primary mode of Jewish activity and identification. For many, however, the complex traditional liturgy of rabbinic Judaism, developed over centuries, proves impenetrable and difficult. Access to the rabbis’ elaborate network of verbal disciplines and practices remains frustratingly elusive. In this course we will explore the development, structure and details of these core practices and experiment with how to use them. We will see how the precise details of rabbinic liturgy were carved out of biblical texts and rabbinic philosophy and we will think about how repetitive verbal patterns might impact on our inner and outer lives.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty:
Contemporary Teshuvot
Roth
16:30
18:30
Description:
This course will focus primarily on teshuvot related to Shabbat, reflecting the fact that the students will have been studying Masechet Shabbat. We will look at teshuvot that are written in English, but reflect detailed halakhic deliberation of specific questions by poskim of repute, from the entire range of the halakhic world. We will also look at some of the classical teshuvot about Shabbat within the Conservative Movement. In addition to the specific content of the teshuvot, we will focus, as well, on what they reflect about the halakhic process and how it functions.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Rabbi Dr. Joel Roth
Minchah & Announcements
16:15
16:30
Shechitah Program
Zacharow
16:30
18:00
18:00
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Maariv
18:30
18:45
Dinner & Night Seder
18:45
20:30
Maariv
18:30
18:45