Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:45
Description:
Bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am and returns at 8:45 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
9:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:30
12:00
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
Lunch Break
12:30
13:30
13:00
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud - 2 Levels - Beginner & Intermediate
Levy & S. Cohen
13:30
16:00
Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Love and Rape – A Look at Biblical Understanding of Sexual [Mis]conduct
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
13:30
16:00
Description:
Man and Woman were created for each other, but how should that relationship look and what does it look like when it goes wrong? We will study some of the biblical texts relevant to this question, and some texts that seem to comment through intertextuality on those sections.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud - 2 Levels - Beginner & Intermediate
Levy & S. Cohen
13:30
16:00
Framing Human Rights
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
13:30
16:00
Description:
Human rights are a consensus based standard used to measure a government's treatment of people subject to its jurisdiction. The global movement for human rights is the most successful attempt in the history of the human species to achieve agreement on legal norms to protect all humans through the just rule of law. Today, people of every major religion, language, culture and country fight for human rights using these shared norms. The rhetoric and legal instruments developed to institute and protect these rights have developed over the 20th century. This course will provide an historical and conceptual introduction to human rights.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud - 2 Levels - Beginner & Intermediate
Levy & S. Cohen
13:30
16:00
Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Love and Rape – A Look at Biblical Understanding of Sexual [Mis]conduct
Vered Hollander-Goldfarb
13:30
16:00
Description:
Man and Woman were created for each other, but how should that relationship look and what does it look like when it goes wrong? We will study some of the biblical texts relevant to this question, and some texts that seem to comment through intertextuality on those sections.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud - 2 Levels - Beginner & Intermediate
Levy & S. Cohen
13:30
16:00
Framing Human Rights
Stephanie Pell, M.P.H., Esq.
13:30
16:00
Description:
Human rights are a consensus based standard used to measure a government's treatment of people subject to its jurisdiction. The global movement for human rights is the most successful attempt in the history of the human species to achieve agreement on legal norms to protect all humans through the just rule of law. Today, people of every major religion, language, culture and country fight for human rights using these shared norms. The rhetoric and legal instruments developed to institute and protect these rights have developed over the 20th century. This course will provide an historical and conceptual introduction to human rights.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Jewish Medical Ethics
Rabbi Alan Iser
13:30
16:00
Description:
Among the topics we will discuss are euthanasia and end of life issues; organ transplants and allocation of scarce medical resources; abortion; and new reproductive technologies.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Talmud - 2 Levels - Beginner & Intermediate
Levy & S. Cohen
13:30
16:00
Torah of Human Rights
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:00
Description:
The Torah is not just a book but a way of life. For thousands of years, Jews have sought the meaning of their lives in the study and practice of Torah. At the core of the Torah project stands the struggle for justice. In this course, we’ll explore the struggle for global human rights through the prism of Torah tradition. Starting with creation, we’ll follow the logic of the Holy Story through the the exile from Eden, the choosing of Abraham, the covenant at Sinai, entering Eretz Yisrael, the visions of the prophets, and the meaning of these in Rabbinic, Medieval and modern interpretation. As we immerse ourselves in the logic of Jewish tradition, we will ask: What do human rights mean in Torah terms? And how can Judaism help achieve global human rights?
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Our Children will be Our Guarantors - Intergenerational Conflict in the Jewish Tradition
Rabbi Andy Katz
16:15
17:30
Description:
While the big Jewish "Legacy Organizations" try to figure out how to engage millennials, some of the most engaged millennials are out there trying to break their power and influence. The conflict is ideological, but there is a profound intergenerational element. We will attempt to unpack and explore the issues involved using traditional sources.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
TBD
Rabbi Joel Levy
16:15
17:30
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
ADAM: The Divine Human Image
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
16:15
17:30
Description:
At the core of Jewish thought stands a paradox: God is irreducibly Other, transcending human understanding, and yet also Loving Person – the "You" of "blessed are You". The bible teaches that we are in the image of God (Gn 1:26) and that God appears in our image (Ez 1:26), but also that God transcends all likeness (Is 40:25). Both the Rambam and the Zohar embrace this paradox through developing an ideal of "higher humanity". Reflecting this ideal in our bodies and lives is the purpose of Torah, the highest form of self-realization, and the greatest closeness to God. In this course, we will explore the ideal of higher humanity as it emerges in the mysticism of the Zohar and the philosophy of the Rambam.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15
Text and Context: How the Art of Memory Explains Rabbinic Judaism and (Maybe) Our Future
Dr. Stephen Arnoff
16:15
17:30
Description:
In piecing together a new Judaism after the destruction of the Second Temple, the sages of late antiquity called upon the best technologies they could find to collect, cultivate, and teach Torah. This meant employing the Art of Memory, an ancient Greco-Roman system for inventorying cultural meaning and content for the iteration and invention of ideas that society required. We will look at where the Art of Memory comes from and how it works in the world of rabbinic text and context. Then we will think about the role of Jewish text and tradition in our age, a time when the Art of Memory converges with the Internet and virtual reality to reinvent Judaism yet again.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Mincha & Announcements
16:00
16:15