Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:45
8:45
Shacharit
7:30
8:45
Shacharit
7:45
8:45
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:45
Description:
Bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am and returns at 8:45 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Shacharit
At Moreshet Yisrael
7:30
8:45
9:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
09:00
12:00
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
Hebrew Ulpan
Various Teachers
9:00
12:15
12:00
Lunch Break
12:15
13:30
Lunch & Learn with Ilana Kurshan
12:00
13:30
Lunch Break
12:15
13:30
Lunch Break
12:15
13:30
Lunch & Learn about the Zohar with Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
12:15
13:30
13:00
Talmud: Shabbat, Unplug and Reboot
Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
13:30
16:30
Description:
In a world of social media, smart houses and suburbia it is increasingly difficulty to just stay put and relax. For this reason Shabbat has taken on new and deepened meaning in contemporary society. How do we face the Biblical challenge to stop on Shabbat? What is 'work" from which we are to refrain? How might the Rabbinic concept of not carrying on Shabbat create a model for intentional community? By an in-depth overview of the Biblical and Rabbinic conceptualizations of Shabbat we will get at the core of the practice and the ways in which it can be used to enrich and inspire a connected and mindful life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Torah Way: Theology, Prayer and Politics
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:30
Description:
This class will explore what it means to approach Torah tradition as a guide to life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Issues in Israeli Society - Through Film
Ittay Flescher
13:30
17:00
Description:
Monday June 18: The racial divide: Ashkenazim and Mizrachim competing for historic justice Monday June 25: The religious divide: Religious and Secular Jews competing for authority and authenticity Monday July 2: The national divide: The Israeli and Palestinian war over land, power and rights Description: Screening extracts from a broad range of Israeli films and TV shows, this course is an opportunity for discussion of ideas and views about Israel and the challenges she faces. Through interactive discussion and debate, we will analyze how Israelis confront the many dilemmas of living in the world’s only Jewish State.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Staging Biblical Narrative: The David Saga
Bex Stern Rosenblatt
13:30
16:30
Description:
It is often said that the biblical narrator is like a movie director. The narrator chooses on whom to focus our attention and which details to reveal in order to tell a story. In this course, we will follow the narrator's direction in order to stage three stories from the David Saga. We will start with a close reading of the text, paying careful attention to the visual presentation of the scene. Then, working in small groups, you will have the opportunity to act out the scenes, using the biblical dialogue and the stage directions given in the Tanakh. Reading about Goliath is one thing, but being Goliath brings a whole new level to our understanding of the story. No acting experience is necessary, just a desire to dive deep into the the intricacies of biblical storytelling.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt
Talmud: Shabbat, Unplug and Reboot
Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
13:30
16:30
Description:
In a world of social media, smart houses and suburbia it is increasingly difficulty to just stay put and relax. For this reason Shabbat has taken on new and deepened meaning in contemporary society. How do we face the Biblical challenge to stop on Shabbat? What is 'work" from which we are to refrain? How might the Rabbinic concept of not carrying on Shabbat create a model for intentional community? By an in-depth overview of the Biblical and Rabbinic conceptualizations of Shabbat we will get at the core of the practice and the ways in which it can be used to enrich and inspire a connected and mindful life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Torah Way: Theology, Prayer and Politics
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:30
Description:
This class will explore what it means to approach Torah tradition as a guide to life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
Crossroads - Walking Encounter
including Mincha
13:45
18:00
Description:
The issues facing Israeli society today are as complex and multi-faceted as the long history of this ancient land. During Crossroads, we will tackle issues of politics, religion, and social justice through a combination of text study, walking tours, and interfacing with key change-makers in Israel today. Come with a curious mind and, when needed, good walking shoes.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty:
Talmud: Shabbat, Unplug and Reboot
Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
13:30
16:30
Description:
In a world of social media, smart houses and suburbia it is increasingly difficulty to just stay put and relax. For this reason Shabbat has taken on new and deepened meaning in contemporary society. How do we face the Biblical challenge to stop on Shabbat? What is 'work" from which we are to refrain? How might the Rabbinic concept of not carrying on Shabbat create a model for intentional community? By an in-depth overview of the Biblical and Rabbinic conceptualizations of Shabbat we will get at the core of the practice and the ways in which it can be used to enrich and inspire a connected and mindful life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rabbi Shoshana Cohen
The Torah Way: Theology, Prayer and Politics
Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
13:30
16:30
Description:
This class will explore what it means to approach Torah tradition as a guide to life.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Dr. Shaiya Rothberg
16:00
Mincha & Announcements
16:30
16:45
Mincha & Announcements
16:30
16:45
Mincha & Announcements
16:30
16:45
Mincha & Announcements
16:30
16:45
17:00
The Nexus between Homeland & Exile
Rachel Adelman
17:00
18:30
Description:
The nexus between homeland and exile lies at the crux of Jewish identity, whether defined primarily as a diaspora existence or centered on Zion as home. Our story begins with the patriarch Abraham, the first to leave his home and go to the land God promised him, the first to wander from that land, and the first to be told that his progeny would be strangers in a land not their own. In this course, we will explore the paradigm of homeland/exile through sacred objects in the classic sources of Tanakh and Midrash: stone monuments, desert wells, buried bones, and the sacred ark(s) of the Tabernacle and Temple. These things would normally be fixed in place but, strangely, move. Does the dislocation derive from the yearning for home and return from exile (as in Joseph’s bones)? Or is it because the locus of the one sacred space is so hard to determine (as in Jacob’s Night Vision at Bet El)? Or perhaps that “wobbling pivot” (J. Z. Smith’s term), in itself, expresses the yearning for homeland in exile (the wandering well and Holy Ark)? Through the prism of sacred stones, rolling wells, disinterred bones and wandering arks, we will explore the central theme of homeland and exile as it maps across memory in Jewish sources.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rachel Adelman
Chumash - Boundaries and Identity
Shuvi Hoffman
17:00
18:30
Description:
Who am I? How am I different than others? What defines my community? These basic questions concern each one of us as individuals and as educators. In this class we will explore foundational texts from the Torah through the prism of boundaries. We will study both stories and laws, and analyze biblical characters and institutions in light of the questions mentioned above. Our learning will include discussions regarding boundaries in time and space, boundaries between Myself and the Other, between Man and God, and between communities. We will also relate to the gray area that exists between the clear-cut borders, and to the possibility of bridging the gap. The focus will be biblical texts, but throughout our study we will also learn relevant Midrashic and philosophical texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Shuvi Hoffman
Nusach Skills
Saralee Shrell-Fox
17:00
18:30
Complaint as Prayer: Lament in the Tanakh
Bex Stern Rosenblatt
17:00
18:30
Description:
In the wake of the calamities leading to the destruction of the First Temple, two very different types of prayer arose: penitential prayer and lament. People acknowledge their wrongdoings, ask God for forgiveness, and request something from God. In this course, however, we will be looking at the other type, communal lament. In this sort of prayer, it is God who is accused of wrongdoing. In vehement and violent terms, God is blamed for allowing the circumstances in which the nation finds itself. Together we will read Psalms, Lamentations and Jeremiah. We will consider the purposes of prayer, post-trauma community formation, images of God, depictions of women as righteous victims, and lastly, how lament might relate to our own prayer lives.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt
The Nexus between Homeland & Exile
Rachel Adelman
17:00
18:30
Description:
The nexus between homeland and exile lies at the crux of Jewish identity, whether defined primarily as a diaspora existence or centered on Zion as home. Our story begins with the patriarch Abraham, the first to leave his home and go to the land God promised him, the first to wander from that land, and the first to be told that his progeny would be strangers in a land not their own. In this course, we will explore the paradigm of homeland/exile through sacred objects in the classic sources of Tanakh and Midrash: stone monuments, desert wells, buried bones, and the sacred ark(s) of the Tabernacle and Temple. These things would normally be fixed in place but, strangely, move. Does the dislocation derive from the yearning for home and return from exile (as in Joseph’s bones)? Or is it because the locus of the one sacred space is so hard to determine (as in Jacob’s Night Vision at Bet El)? Or perhaps that “wobbling pivot” (J. Z. Smith’s term), in itself, expresses the yearning for homeland in exile (the wandering well and Holy Ark)? Through the prism of sacred stones, rolling wells, disinterred bones and wandering arks, we will explore the central theme of homeland and exile as it maps across memory in Jewish sources.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Rachel Adelman
Chumash - Boundaries and Identity
Shuvi Hoffman
17:00
18:30
Description:
Who am I? How am I different than others? What defines my community? These basic questions concern each one of us as individuals and as educators. In this class we will explore foundational texts from the Torah through the prism of boundaries. We will study both stories and laws, and analyze biblical characters and institutions in light of the questions mentioned above. Our learning will include discussions regarding boundaries in time and space, boundaries between Myself and the Other, between Man and God, and between communities. We will also relate to the gray area that exists between the clear-cut borders, and to the possibility of bridging the gap. The focus will be biblical texts, but throughout our study we will also learn relevant Midrashic and philosophical texts.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: Shuvi Hoffman
Nusach Skills
Saralee Shrell-Fox
17:00
18:30
Complaint as Prayer: Lament in the Tanakh
Bex Stern Rosenblatt
17:00
18:30
Description:
In the wake of the calamities leading to the destruction of the First Temple, two very different types of prayer arose: penitential prayer and lament. People acknowledge their wrongdoings, ask God for forgiveness, and request something from God. In this course, however, we will be looking at the other type, communal lament. In this sort of prayer, it is God who is accused of wrongdoing. In vehement and violent terms, God is blamed for allowing the circumstances in which the nation finds itself. Together we will read Psalms, Lamentations and Jeremiah. We will consider the purposes of prayer, post-trauma community formation, images of God, depictions of women as righteous victims, and lastly, how lament might relate to our own prayer lives.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: English
Faculty: Bex Stern Rosenblatt