Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
7:00
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
At the Kotel
7:00
8:45
Description:
Bus leaves the Yeshiva at 7:00 am and returns at 8:45 am.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language: עברית
Faculty:
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
Shacharit
7:30
8:30
9:00
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Midrash for Sermons
Rabbi Mordechai Silverstein
9:00
12:00
Description:
In this course we will examine midrashim from more and less known midrashic collections which offer valuable sources for drashot. We will attempt to develop methodology for transforming these sources into spiritually enriching material for contemporary audiences. Special attention will be given to generally difficult material in the Torah for preaching and how the midrashic tradition serves as a valuable resource to contend with this problem.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
12:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
Lunch Break
12:00
14:00
14:00
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
"I am spiritual by not religious"- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
"I am spiritual by not religious"- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
"I am spiritual by not religious"- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Halakhah of Funerals & Weddings
Rabbi Joel Roth
14:00
17:00
Description:
A look at some of the halakhic questions relevant to a variety of the modern issues involving marriage and death/burial, based on both classical and modern responsa.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty:
Kabbalah of Halakhah: Revealing Mysteries Within the Law
Rabbi Aubrey Glazer
14:00
17:00
Description:
"I am spiritual by not religious"- is this quip every rabbi encounters really true? Can authentic spirituality exist apart of a religious regimen? Or we might ask: what is authentic the role of Kabbalah in Halakhah ? Too often, we accentuate the tension between mystical and formal religious practice. Mystics strive for a deeply personal relationship with the infinite, while organized religion tries to create formal and finite modes of practice. In this course, we will explore how Kabbalistic and Hasidic practice is incorporated into halakhah as part of formal religious practice. Our investigation will build upon the research of Jacob Katz in his renowned study, Halakhah and Kabbalah: Studies in the History of Jewish Religion, its Various Faces and Social Relevance (1984) which shows how the legalist-mystic of Safed, Rabbi Joseph Karo weighed the halakhic value of Zoharic prescriptions and later integrated them into his legal codex, called the Shulchan Aruch. In this course, we will analyze a vast Hasidic commentary on the Shulchan Aruch, called, Liqqutei Halakhot edited by Reb Natan of Nemirov. His task was to compile Liqqutai MoHaRaN, the teachings of his master, Reb Nahman of Bratzlav, according to the structure of Shulchan Aruch. This course will focus on the kabbalah of halakhah, or the mystical meanings of the laws surrounding ‘Erusin, Kiddushin, Ketubot, and Gittin.
Required Texts:
Schedule:
Language:
Faculty: